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the united states six years atoka in my first i told the mexican people that it was possible to transform mexico. i say that we could turn it into a postal nation with a competitive economy and we could build a first site to with more opportunities for everyone. we have mexico in a safer nation with a strong will of dhaka. i can tell you today we have made great strides and help put mexico on the track to make these decisions a reality. i would like to share some reflections on health care we have a stronger nation. let me start by talking of the transformation of the mexican economy. as you know, we have to confront the global kinnock crisis in memory. mexico was particularly vulnerable because our ties to the american economy which was at the epicenter of the crisis years ago half to and we took the necessary measures to prevent this crisis from becoming a major catastrophe. in doing so we were guided with three basic. financial discipline, economic freedom and increased competitiveness in we stayed after the country. first mexico has strong economic fundamentals. many countries put in
way? what constitutes the wrong way? here in united states and in the middle east there is enormous debate over how to handle iran's pursuit of a nuclear enrichment capability, a capability which would give iran the ability to manufacture nuclear weapons if they chose to do so. and obvious a this is an issue that's been with us for a very long time. i remember i first encountered it in immediate aftermath of the gulf war in 1991 when israel purchased 25 longer-range f-15 e. strike fighters. and those fighters were designated not f-15 e., but f-15-i. and the manufacture said that the i was for israel. if you spoke to israeli air force pilots and commanders, what the uniform would say to you is now now now that i is for iraq. this is an issue, this is a problem, it is a threat that the israelis have been thinking about for a very long time. they has been a great deal of effort trying to figure out how to develop a military option to disarm iran, to destroy its nuclear program if they ever chose to do so. and they've been working very deciduous lead at the. but by the same token, you w
that it is going as you will understand the united states we understand of madison and jefferson and washington how they form the country but would be a very good basis for understanding what was going on in the united states so current china was very much shaped by deng xiaoping. he came to power in 1978 and was the dominant person right up until 1992 for the period of about 14 years. what i thought i would do in the brief time today i was told to not talk for more than 20 minutes would be to talk about some of the forces that shaped what he was and what he did to transform china because 1978 the country that he inherited had a per capita income of less than $100 per capita. now is estimated somewhere rs/6000 and it's on the path of that he is headed on. there is almost no migration from the countryside in the city and since he came perhaps 200 million have moved from the countryside to the town and the city. when he came to power the country was still involved in the cultural revolution and the relevant nettie toward each other and he worked to unite the country to set it on the new path. what ar
to take action against terrorist the plots. whether it confronts us here in the united states or abroad. in june of 2009, fbi directer acknowledged the challenge facing the bureau stating, "it is not sufficient for us as an organization to respond to a terrorist attack after it has occurred. it is important for us as an organization to develop the intelligence to anticipate the terrorist attack developing intelligence, developing facts. and the past we looked at collecting facts for the courtroom. we now have to think of ourselves as gathering facts painting a picture of a particular threat understanding the risk and moving to reduce that risk. and i couldn't agree more with the directer's statement. and then on november 5, 2009, a gunman walked in the soldier readiness center at fort hood, texas and shouted the jihaddic term. and opened fire on unarmed soldiers and civilians. he killed 13 and wounded 43 42 others. was the most horrific terrorist attack on the u.s. soil since 9/11. today we will exam the facts of the fort hood case as we know them to better understand how these facts
, tribal, territorial and international partners and members of this committee. while the united states has made significant progress since the 9/11 attacks, we know threats from terror persist and continually evolve. we faced direct threats from al qaeda. we face growing threats of other foreign-based terrorist groups, which are inspired by al qaeda ideology, such as hq ap and al-shabaab. we must address threats that are homegrown as well as those that originate abroad. is threats are not limited to any one individual, group or ideology and as we have seen taxes employed by terrorists can be as simple as a homemade bomb or as sophisticated as the biologic threat or coordinated cyberattack. while we deal with a number of threats and threat actors at any given time, three areas merit special sustained attention. the first is aviation. christmas day 2000 plot, the october 2010th air cargo thread in the aqa peapod earlier this year would have targeted a u.s. bound airliner with explosives made clear that commercial aviation remains a target. terrace, especially aqap continue to seek ways to ci
do they talk about the united states and how do they talk about the union and the confederacy. how do they talk about the south that it would substantially different from each other and voila i would have something to say so i headed off into the archives. >> first of all but archives? >> archive server every state that fought in the war in this book. some are the huge ones that immediately come to mind the library of congress or carlisle barracks in pennsylvania which has an enormous army history collection but also smaller libraries state historical associations, the alabama department of the agriculture the vermont historical society in independence misery and again the point was i didn't want to read more about u.s. grant i wanted to be about the back of the line so that's why i looked for him. i look at the flag and i think of my farm or my wife and mother they didn't cooperate and do what i wanted them to do and i was frustrated with them for that reason petraeus too were you find a similar thing before the union and confederate soldiers? >> two things. i knew the union and conf
action to put our fiscal health in order and obviously that is a bigger challenge in the united states were adding a trillion dollars in debt year after year -- though how does it unplayed? >> that could serve as a source of entertainment to the canadian community. >> how do you think the u.s. does play out? >> i think that is a big risk and the frustrating thing in the u.s. is that the core is so strong and so good. you know we have illegal immigration by the way the average -- no growth over five years which includes a downturn but basically it's a big economy in 2% on a big economy as a big number and i think it goes. but it's very -- these problems are self-inflicted to a great extent and it makes it all the more frustrating and it must be frustrating to watch last summer with the debt ceiling and save why don't you compromise and why don't you get this done? i would say it's sometimes more frustrating to watch something that you can undo. it's like seeing it spiraling and you wish you could stop it and is within everybody's power to stop it. i think it's a political system to some
. the united states of america with their two presence in afghanistan with peace and stability, then you are personally the national interest of pakistan because the known and unknown objective of pakistan within the region is also peace and stability. why talk about the regional approach is to give you confidence for your buck the talk of first doing that. that she must not look at us, but she must look at us from the lens have today in the toasty today the future that pakistan wants for itself as that of peace and stability in. and we have a peaceful, stable region, everything else will work great. so is a march on i think we need to send each other messages. one of the means is to send that message out, that we are keen to work together to ensure that in afghanistan we are able to achieve together long sustainable fees, less admitted that we are not able to achieve. so let's work together. this put our energies together, our resources together. let's not blame each other. let's find time to sit together to work through this together because as i said, this is something that in this re
the united states and it was designed in a way that it didn't require going to the court and the national security agency or others who are trying to wiretap people outside the united states. the problem is that in defining the parameters of what communications would require and what surveillance is required and which ones didn't the statute referred to the technology of the time as communications that were wired in communications over radio, the satellite technology. the problem is in 1978 we see a dramatic change in technology of communications and in particular fiber-optic cables all over the world which is actually very much changed the routing indications that change the requirement, the court order requirements they face when they try to get into electronic surveillance in the result of that is that leading up to 9/11 there are many instances where the government would have to go to the fisa court to get an order from the fisa court for the could electronically surveilled or wiretap someone overseas and that was not the intent of fisa. the intelligence surveillance act the amendment
. there was no clear consensus about what is the ultimate goal of the united states and europe. is the goal of the one hand or is this just a customs union? it's so dissimilar as many have pointed to the formation of the united states. but here again the idea was let's not try to reach agreement on the end result because there is no consensus but let's take a step at a time and develop the institutions necessary as the problems come up. what wasn't perceived as the context of which the huge decisions would have to be taken was the mother of all financial crises from the united states. so, the pressures are far greater than we are anticipating and the year being forced into making big decisions. we are going to find out if they are willing to make the sacrifices necessary to sustain and. yesterday the peterson institute presented an interesting study of spain and italy whether it was sustainable the conclusion is of the plausible scenarios and the answer is yes. under the circumstances it seemed to me surprising if the project would be abandoned in a sense in that context. >> we and interesting meeting
, and he is the president of the united states. wilson, he is sick. but he sends his secretary of state to the convention to emcee the convention. >> host: he wanted the nomination. >> guest: he wanted the nomination, and harding, coolidge, hoover, fdr is on the ticket as a vice presidential candidate, and so you have this hook and so much else going on with the league of nations and everything other thing. and 1960, we move on to where you have three titanic personalities. we don't have six but we have three of the biggest name brands in presidential personalities ever. kennedy, nixon, johnson, and so very, very different. so very, very different amibitions in terms of personal, and something which i think resonates so much with folks who are reading books today. 1948, a great cliffhanger, and we love to listen to the experts and get the weather reports, and they're always wrong, and the polls are always wrong, and the experts are always wrong, and by god we love it when we're smarter than they are, and it turns out we can look back in hindsight and see how wrong they were in 1948. and
those made about the domestic and foreign policies. in the united states and in europe. their voices are not heard, even if they constitute 99% of the society's. human and ethical values are sacrificed in order to -- and their willingness to listen to the demands of the people has become only a two at a time in election. the current world order is -- and based on injustice. distinguished friends and colleagues, what should be done and what is the way out of the current situation? there is no doubt that the world is in need of a new order and a fresh way of thinking, in order in which man is recognized as god's supreme creation enjoying material and the spiritual qualities and possessing a divine nation filled with a desire to see justice. an order that aims to revive human dignity and believes in universal happiness and perfection. three, in order which is at peace, security and welfare for all walks of life around the globe. four, in order found upon trust in order. rulers must love -- five, a just and fair order in which everybody is equal before love and in which there is no -- le
for a permanent display in emancipation hall of the united states capitol. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent, mr. president, that the bill be read three times, passed, the motion to reconsider be laid on the table, with no intervening action or debate, any statements related to this matter be placed in the record as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i now ask consent that the senate proceed to s. res. 551. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: s. res. 51, commending the four american public servants who died in benghazi libya, including ambassador j. christopher stevens for their efforts on behalf of the american people in condemning the attack on the united states consulate in benghazi. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. reid: mr. president, i now ask that the resolution be bread to the preamble be agreed to, the motion to reconsider be laid on the table, with no intervening action or
of the united states air are space industry. and i said, you got the right tyson? i fly in airplanes, i don't fly airplanes. but -- we know who we are. we read your writers. i said could they have read? what, how? and i said who else? so they read me the list of other people buzz al drin was going to be on the commission, and just in case you don't remember, he was apollo 11 astronaut. the second person to walk on the moon of the first mission to the lunar surface. so -- all right there are wellful commissioners appointed to this. all right. now i'm from new york city, born and raised. in new york, you can go all day without ever even seeing a republican. okay. [laughter] so -- [laughter] [applause] m i lying? i'm not. i'm not -- [laughter] there goes one, he's in the corner, in the back, i think. so i'm getting called by a republican president and i'm an academic, and i later learn that -- i've learned that george bush at yale did not do well at the astronomy class. and so -- they said, we have to ask you a few questions. and out came a series of questions. all the questions that are like
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14